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RFE/RL Newsline, Vol. 4, No. 111, 00-06-08

Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty: Newsline Directory - Previous Article - Next Article

From: Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty <http://www.rferl.org>

RFE/RL NEWSLINE

Vol. 4, No. 111, 8 June 2000


CONTENTS

[A] TRANSCAUCASUS AND CENTRAL ASIA

  • [01] WORLD BANK AGAIN WARNS ARMENIA OVER ENERGY NETWORK
  • [02] ARMENIA, IRAN, GREECE ASSESS COOPERATION
  • [03] NEW GEORGIAN GOVERNMENT HOLDS FIRST SESSION
  • [04] GEORGIAN PARLIAMENT MAJORITY, MINORITY STILL AT ODDS
  • [05] GEORGIAN GUERRILLAS REVERT TO OLD TACTICS?
  • [06] KAZAKHSTAN TO MONITOR ARMS SALES
  • [07] WILL MOSCOW DEMAND TERRITORIAL AUTONOMY FOR RUSSIANS
  • [08] TWO KAZAKH OPPOSITIONISTS FINED
  • [09] KYRGYZ ROUNDTABLE IN JEOPARDY
  • [10] COURT OVERTURNS RULING AGAINST KYRGYZ OPPOSITION
  • [11] IRANIANS DETAINED IN TAJIKISTAN FOR ALUMINUM

  • [B] SOUTHEASTERN EUROPE

  • [12] SLOVENIA HAS NEW GOVERNMENT
  • [13] PETRITSCH SLAMS BOSNIAN PRIME MINISTER
  • [14] SARAJEVO POLICE ARREST SERBIAN WAR CRIMES SUSPECT
  • [15] FORMER BOSNIAN SERB POLICE CHIEF KILLED
  • [16] MONTENEGRIN TRIAL OF ALLEGED KILLER OF MUSLIMS
  • [17] MILOSEVIC BACKERS WARN OF 'TORRENT OF EVIL' IN
  • [18] CROATIAN, SERBIAN REFUGEES TO COOPERATE
  • [19] FORMER CROATIAN MILITARY LEADER CHARGES INTIMIDATION
  • [20] RED CROSS APPEALS FOR NEWS OF MISSING IN KOSOVA
  • [21] SOLANA CALLS FOR BETTER TREATMENT OF KOSOVA'S SERBS
  • [22] SERBIAN COURT ORDERS BROVINA RETRIAL
  • [23] MACEDONIA STEPS UP BORDER SECURITY
  • [24] U.S. AID FOR MINE REMOVAL IN ALBANIA
  • [25] IMF EXTENDS ROMANIAN STAND-BY LOAN
  • [26] ROMANIAN INVESTORS CLASH WITH RIOT POLICE
  • [27] HUNGARIAN CANDIDATE WITHDRAWS FROM TRANSYLVANIAN

  • [C] END NOTE

  • [28] CHORNOBYL CLOSURE MEANS SEARCH FOR STORAGE SITES, NEW

  • [A] TRANSCAUCASUS AND CENTRAL ASIA

    [01] WORLD BANK AGAIN WARNS ARMENIA OVER ENERGY NETWORK

    PRIVATIZATION

    Salman Zaheer, who is a senior energy consultant with the World

    Bank, told journalists in Yerevan on 7 June that the Russian firms seeking to gain control

    of four Armenian energy distribution networks are not as qualified to develop that sector as

    their Western competitors, RFE/RL's Yerevan bureau reported. Other senior World Bank

    officials warned last month that disbursement of further loans to Armenia is contingent on

    the privatization of those networks by one of four Western companies shortlisted in the

    tender (see "RFE/RL Newsline," 26 April and 15 May 2000). Armenian parliamentary

    sources told RFE/RL last week that the two Russian companies concerned have proposed

    abandoning the tender and creating joint ventures with the Armenian government. Speaking

    on Armenian National Television on 5 June, Orinats Yerkir party leader Artur Bagdasarian

    condemned the bank's attempt to dictate the terms of the privatization as unacceptable and

    an obstacle to developing the Armenian economy, Groong reported. LF

    [02] ARMENIA, IRAN, GREECE ASSESS COOPERATION

    Attending the second

    session of the industry and technology committee of the Armenia-Iran-Greece economic

    grouping in Yerevan on 7 June, trade and industry officials from those three countries

    sought ways to boost trilateral economic cooperation and trade, RFE/RL's bureau in the

    Armenian capital reported. They noted that previous agreements aimed at increasing ties

    have not been implemented despite the "strong political will" of the countries concerned.

    Armenian Industry and Trade Minister Karen Chshmaritian stressed the need for a solid

    legal basis for such cooperation, according to ITAR-TASS. In a joint memorandum, the

    three sides singled out the chemical, pharmaceutical, and construction sectors as promising

    areas for future cooperation. A group of Iranian businessmen attending the meeting

    proposed to open a number of manufacturing enterprises in Armenia with the financial

    assistance of their Greek and other Western partners. LF

    [03] NEW GEORGIAN GOVERNMENT HOLDS FIRST SESSION

    President

    Eduard Shevardnadze chaired the first session of the new government at the state

    chancellery on 7 June, saying that the cabinet's priorities include solving social problems,

    restoring Georgia's territorial integrity, and meeting budget revenue targets, Interfax

    reported. Shevardnadze criticized reappointed Minister for Tax Revenues Mikhail

    Machavariani for his inability to achieve that latter goal. Machavariani was initially

    appointed six months ago. Bakur Gulua, whom Shevardnadze proposed as minister of

    agriculture, was reportedly asked to leave the session as parliamentary deputies had rejected

    his candidacy (see "RFE/RL Newsline," 25 May 2000). LF

    [04] GEORGIAN PARLIAMENT MAJORITY, MINORITY STILL AT ODDS

    OVER PREMIERSHIP

    Parliamentary speaker Zurab Zhvania and Union of Georgian

    Traditionalists leader Akaki Asatiani on 7 June failed to reach an agreement that would

    permit a debate on Asatiani's proposal to amend the constitution to reintroduce the post of

    premier (see "RFE/RL Caucasus Report," Vol. 3, No. 17, 28 April 2000 and "RFE/RL

    Newsline," 7 June 2000). Asatiani told journalists, however, that Zhvania does not reject

    the restoration of the premiership but considers it inappropriate at present. Majority Union

    of Citizens of Georgia faction leader Mikhail Saakashvili similarly told journalists on 7

    June that the reintroduction of the cabinet of ministers at the present stage would reduce the

    parliament to "an appendix" to the executive and thus result in "a non- democratic

    authoritarian regime." But he said that model could be reintroduced within six or seven

    years. LF

    [05] GEORGIAN GUERRILLAS REVERT TO OLD TACTICS?

    Two observation

    posts of the CIS peacekeeping force in Abkhazia's Gali Raion were subjected to machine-

    gun fire on 7 June, but no casualties were reported, according to Caucasus Press. It was

    the second such attack since the beginning of this month. Between 1994 (when the CIS

    peacekeepers were first deployed in western Georgia) and 1998, Georgian guerrillas

    systematically targeted the Russian peacekeepers, killing more than 60 of them. But in

    recent years they have concentrated their attacks on Abkhaz police patrols. LF

    [06] KAZAKHSTAN TO MONITOR ARMS SALES

    President Nursultan Nazarbaev

    has instructed Kazakhstan's Security Council to set up a special body that will endorse

    planned sales of armaments to buyers abroad, Interfax and Reuters reported on 7 June. In

    addition, an inventory will be conducted by the end of this year of all weapons kept at

    Defense Ministry depots, Defense Minister Sat Tokpakbaev said the same day. He said

    there had been 12 cases of thefts of weaponry from such facilities in 1999. Also on 7 June,

    the Security Council approved a new draft military reform concept and a state program of

    military construction from 2000 to 2005, Interfax reported (see "RFE/RL Newsline," 3

    February 2000). LF

    [07] WILL MOSCOW DEMAND TERRITORIAL AUTONOMY FOR RUSSIANS

    IN KAZAKHSTAN?

    Moscow plans to convene a congress on 23-24 June of ethnic

    Kazakhs living in the Russian Federation, which will discuss the creation of a Kazakh

    autonomous formation centered on Orenburg, RFE/RL's Kazakh Service reported on 7

    June, citing APN. Western observers conclude that the only explanation for creating such a

    territorial unit is to provide the rationale for Moscow to demand similar autonomy for the

    Russian population of northern Kazakhstan (see "End Note," "RFE/RL Newsline, " 15

    May 2000). LF

    [08] TWO KAZAKH OPPOSITIONISTS FINED

    An Almaty district court on 7 June

    fined two members of former Premier Akezhan Kazhegeldin's Republican People's Party

    of Kazakhstan 2,900 tenges ($20) each for participating in an unsanctioned demonstration

    in Almaty on 31 May to commemorate victims of political oppression, RFE/RL's

    correspondent in the former capital reported. LF

    [09] KYRGYZ ROUNDTABLE IN JEOPARDY

    The Communist Party of Kyrgyzstan

    and the Democratic Movement of Kyrgyzstan both announced in Bishkek on 7 June that

    they will not participate in the roundtable discussion between government, opposition

    parties and NGOs scheduled for 8-9 June, RFE/RL's bureau in the Kyrgyz capital

    reported. Their decision raises to six the number of opposition parties boycotting the

    session, according to Reuters. Jerzy Wenclaw, who heads the OSCE's Bishkek

    representation, told the news agency that the OSCE will not send a representative to the

    discussion as the format under which it will be held is no longer that originally agreed upon

    in March by the OSCE and the Kyrgyz leadership. LF

    [10] COURT OVERTURNS RULING AGAINST KYRGYZ OPPOSITION

    NEWSPAPER

    The Bishkek City Court on 8 June overturned the 31 March ruling by a

    Bishkek district court sentencing the independent weekly newspaper "Res Publika" to pay a

    50,000 som ($1,000) fine for insulting the former chairman of the Kyrgyz Committee for

    Human Rights, RFE/RL's Bishkek bureau reported (see "RFE/RL Newsline," 3 April

    2000). The newspaper ceased publication in late March after being fined 200, 000 soms in

    another slander case (see "RFE/RL Newsline," 18 January 2000). LF

    [11] IRANIANS DETAINED IN TAJIKISTAN FOR ALUMINUM

    SMUGGLING

    Police in Turzunzade Oblast in western Tajikistan, the site of the

    country's largest aluminum smelter, detained on 6 June three Iranians suspected of trying

    to smuggle a total of 21 tons of top grade aluminum out of the country, ITAR-TASS

    reported. According to a Tajik Interior Ministry official, since the beginning of the year its

    personnel have intercepted more than 600 tons of aluminum intended for illegal export (see

    also "RFE/RL Newsline," 28 December 1999). LF


    [B] SOUTHEASTERN EUROPE

    [12] SLOVENIA HAS NEW GOVERNMENT

    The parliament on 7 June voted 46 to 44

    to approve the center-right cabinet proposed by Prime Minister Andrej Bajuk, thereby

    ending a political crisis that has lasted since April. Slovenia will have a functioning

    government until scheduled elections take place in the fall. The new cabinet is the first since

    independence that is not led by former members of the communist-era nomenklatura (see

    "RFE/RL Balkan Report," 30 May 2000). The government's main task is to enact

    legislation necessary to help meet admission requirements for the EU. There is a broad

    consensus in Slovenian politics on the need to join the EU as soon as possible. PM

    [13] PETRITSCH SLAMS BOSNIAN PRIME MINISTER

    Wolfgang Petritsch, who

    is the international community's high representative in Bosnia, said in Sarajevo on 7 June

    that joint Prime Minister Spasoje Tusevljak is a "virtual unknown" who was selected by the

    joint presidency and parliament in an "unprofessional way." Petritsch criticized recent

    remarks by Tusevljak, in which the economics professor argued that the reintegration of the

    various parts of Bosnia should proceed slowly. The Austrian diplomat argued that "we

    need to speed up the process of implementing [the 1995 Dayton agreement], not to slow it

    down." Tusevljak does not belong to any party. After war broke out in 1992, he was an

    economics adviser to former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic, Reuters reported.

    U.S. Ambassador to Bosnia Thomas Miller also said that he is "very disappointed" with

    the selection of Tusevljak. Social Democratic leader Sejfudin Tokic said that the new prime

    minister will bring Bosnia closer to Belgrade and away from Europe, "Oslobodjenje"

    reported. PM

    [14] SARAJEVO POLICE ARREST SERBIAN WAR CRIMES SUSPECT

    Police

    arrested Miroslav Pandurevic on 7 June in the Bosnian capital. It is not clear what the

    charges are, except that a Bosnian court indicted him in March for "atrocities against

    civilians," Reuters reported. In 1997, the Hague-based war crimes tribunal ruled that there

    is not enough evidence to substantiate charges of war crimes against him but that there is

    sufficient evidence to try him for murder, a spokesman for the tribunal told the news

    agency. Under the terms of the Bosnian peace settlement, any local court seeking to try a

    suspect for war crimes must obtain the tribunal's permission first. PM

    [15] FORMER BOSNIAN SERB POLICE CHIEF KILLED

    Unidentified gunmen

    killed Ljubisa Savic Mauzer in a drive-by slaying in Bijeljina on 7 June. Mauzer was a

    hard-line Serbian warlord in the area during the 1992-1995 war but later switched his

    loyalties to the moderate Prime Minister Milorad Dodik. Mauzer lost his job as head of the

    Bosnian Serb police in 1998 after being accused of using improper methods to convict

    hard-liners who had killed a local police chief. PM

    [16] MONTENEGRIN TRIAL OF ALLEGED KILLER OF MUSLIMS

    RESUMES

    The trial of Nebojsa Ranisavljevic from Despotovac resumed in the

    Montenegrin town of Bijelo Polje on 7 June after a break of two years. Ranisavljevic is

    charged with having planned and carried out the abduction and murder of some 20 mainly

    Muslim passengers from a train on the Belgrade-Bar route in 1993. The trial reopened

    because Bosnian Serb authorities recently permitted Montenegrin experts to carry out an

    investigation on the site where the killings took place, RFE/RL's South Slavic Service

    reported. PM

    [17] MILOSEVIC BACKERS WARN OF 'TORRENT OF EVIL' IN

    MONTENEGRO

    In the runup to the local elections in Podgorica and Herceg Novi on

    11 June, Bozidar Bojovic of the pro-Belgrade Serbian People's Party said in Podgorica on

    8 June that a "torrent of evil...will cover Montenegro" if President Milo Djukanovic and his

    backers try to "steal the elections as [they did] in 1998," when Djukanovic won the

    presidency. Bojovic stressed that "you cannot build a barrier between Montenegro and

    Serbia without the river coming and carrying away that barrier, put there by force and not

    the peoples' will," Reuters reported. Bojovic warned that "in case of election fraud..., 65

    percent of Montenegrins will not sit quietly with folded arms," AP reported. PM

    [18] CROATIAN, SERBIAN REFUGEES TO COOPERATE

    An association of

    Croatian refugees from Bosnia and two organizations of Serbian refugees from Croatia

    have agreed to work together to solve common problems, dpa reported from Zagreb on 7

    June. Croatian Serb leader Milorad Pupovac said that "this is a new philosophy of political

    conduct and an important step in Croatia-Serbian relations that many people did not

    expect." In many cases, Serbian families from Croatia are now living in the former homes

    of Croatian refugees from Bosnia and vice versa. PM

    [19] FORMER CROATIAN MILITARY LEADER CHARGES INTIMIDATION

    BY POLICE

    Retired General Janko Bobetko, who was one of Croatia's military leaders

    early in the 1990-1995 conflict with Serbian forces, said that armed police tried to

    "humiliate" him by appearing in front of his home in Split, "Vecernji list" reported on 8

    June. Bobetko argued that the incident was part of an alleged campaign by the current

    government to portray the war in a bad light and discredit the reputation of those who

    fought in it. He warned: "Let [the police] try to fire three bullets at me, because I'll fire

    back after the first one." PM

    [20] RED CROSS APPEALS FOR NEWS OF MISSING IN KOSOVA

    Officials of

    the International Committee of the Red Cross said in Geneva on 7 June that some 3,368

    persons remain unaccounted for as a result of the recent conflict in Kosova. The missing

    include about 2,700 ethnic Albanians, 400 Serbs, 100 Roma, and 150 members of various

    other ethnic groups. The officials added that the remains of some 2,000 people have been

    found but not identified. PM

    [21] SOLANA CALLS FOR BETTER TREATMENT OF KOSOVA'S SERBS

    Javier Solana, who is the EU's chief official for foreign and security policy, said in

    Thessaloniki on 7 June that "the Serbian community in Kosovo has been treated in a

    manner that cannot be tolerated," Reuters reported. Referring to the political situation in

    Serbia, he called on the EU to "cooperate with the civil society in Yugoslavia." He added,

    however, that "the change of the political situation in Serbia is the responsibility of the

    people of Serbia." Meanwhile in Belgrade, the Yugoslav government issued a statement

    calling on NATO and the UN to leave Kosova because they have failed to ensure the safety

    of local Serbs. PM

    [22] SERBIAN COURT ORDERS BROVINA RETRIAL

    The Supreme Court on 7

    June ordered a retrial of Kosova rights activist Flora Brovina. She had been sentenced by a

    lower court to 12 years in prison for allegedly helping "terrorists" during the conflict in

    Kosova. The sentencing led to an international outcry from many human rights and writers'

    organizations. PM

    [23] MACEDONIA STEPS UP BORDER SECURITY

    A government spokesman said

    in Skopje on 7 June that frontier guards "will shoot without warning at everyone who tries

    to cross [Macedonia's borders] illegally," AP reported. The previous day, President Boris

    Tajkovski told NATO ambassadors that Macedonia will have to take "unilateral measures to

    protect its borders, territory, and integrity" unless KFOR does more to prevent incidents

    along the frontier separating Macedonia and Kosova (see "RFE/RL Newsline," 6 June

    2000). A NATO spokesman said in Brussels that officials of the Atlantic alliance will soon

    discuss the matter. PM

    [24] U.S. AID FOR MINE REMOVAL IN ALBANIA

    A spokesman for the U.S.

    embassy in Tirana said on 7 June that Washington has given the Albanian government $1

    million to help remove remaining mines laid by Serbian forces along Albania's frontiers in

    1999. PM

    [25] IMF EXTENDS ROMANIAN STAND-BY LOAN

    The IMF executive board has

    extended last year's $540 million stand-by loan to Romania until 28 February 2001.

    Romania will immediately receive the second $110 million tranche of that loan, which will

    enable the World Bank to resume the disbursement of loans, Romanian Radio

    reported on 8 June. IMF First Deputy Managing Director Stanley Fischer was quoted by

    Reuters as praising Romania's economic performance in the last six months but said the

    country must forge ahead with reforms, particularly in the banking sector. MS

    [26] ROMANIAN INVESTORS CLASH WITH RIOT POLICE

    More than 1,000

    people who had invested in the collapsed National Investment Fund clashed with riot police

    outside the government's headquarters in Bucharest on 7 June as they staged a protest to

    demand that the government return their money. Police fired tear gas to disperse the crowd,

    which became even more angry after the driver of a passing car lost control of his vehicle

    and ran over two protesters, one of whom sustained serious injuries. The driver ran away

    from the scene and demonstrators set his car on fire, RFE/RL's Bucharest bureau reported.

    Later, a group of protesters was received by Prime Minister Mugur Isarescu. Romanian

    Radio said the two sides agreed that the government cannot compensate individuals for lost

    investments and that those affected must file complaints against the fund's management.

    MS

    [27] HUNGARIAN CANDIDATE WITHDRAWS FROM TRANSYLVANIAN

    RUNOFF

    Peter Kovacs Eckstein of the Hungarian Democratic Federation of Romania,

    who placed second in the 4 June Cluj mayoral elections, has announced that he is

    withdrawing from the runoff against incumbent nationalist Mayor Gheorghe Funar in favor

    of third-placed Democratic Convention of Romania candidate Serban Radulescu. Kovacs

    Eckstein, who is minister without portfolio in charge of national minorities affairs,

    explained his decision by saying it is necessary to unite all forces opposed to Funar and

    avoid having the vote split along ethnic lines. In the 4 June ballot, he received 21 percent,

    roughly equivalent to the percentage of the town's ethnic Hungarian population. Funar

    received nearly 46 percent backing and Radulescu 11.5 percent, Mediafax reported. MS


    [C] END NOTE

    [28] CHORNOBYL CLOSURE MEANS SEARCH FOR STORAGE SITES, NEW

    ENERGY

    By Tuck Wesolowsky

    As expected, Ukrainian President Leonid Kuchma announced on 5 June that the last

    nuclear reactor at Chornobyl will be shut down on 15 December.

    Kuchma made that statement in Kyiv during a six-hour visit to the Ukrainian capital

    by U.S. President Bill Clinton. The U.S. has been one of several countries appealing to

    Ukraine for years to decommission Chornobyl.

    The nuclear plant was the site of the world's worst civilian nuclear disaster, when

    reactor Number Four exploded on 26 April 1986, spewing radioactive fallout across

    Europe. Although most of the fallout fell on neighboring Belarus, radiation was detected as

    far away as Japan. Today, only reactor Number Three is in operation. Number Two was

    shut down in 1991, and Number One five years later.

    Mils Bohmer, a nuclear physicist working for the Oslo-based nuclear- monitoring

    organization Bellona, says it was the fading likelihood of more Western aid to upgrade

    Ukraine's rickety energy infrastructure, coupled with growing problems at Chornobyl, that

    prompted Kuchma to act now. "There have been a lot of technical problems with the

    Chornobyl reactor," he commented. "Since Christmas the remaining reactor has been

    [stopped] every other week...because of technical problems."

    Tobias Munchmeyer, an anti-nuclear campaigner with Greenpeace, says shutting

    down the sole operating nuclear reactor at Chornobyl should be relatively problem-free.

    The most pressing matter now, Munchmeyer says, is finding storage for the spent fuel and

    other radioactive waste inside reactor Number Three. "The reactor contains [not only] spent

    nuclear fuel," he notes, "but also tons of light-, medium-, and high- radiated nuclear waste,

    and this has to be decommissioned to be stored somewhere.... The financing for this

    decommissioning work has been given by G-7 countries."

    During his visit to Ukraine earlier this week, Clinton pledged $78 million to rebuild

    the sarcophagus entombing the crippled Number Four reactor. Next month in Berlin,

    donors from 40 countries are expected to announce they have secured the necessary $700

    million to rebuild the concrete encasement, which was constructed in haste following the

    1986 accident, and now has several cracks.

    During Clinton's visit, no mention was made of a project that has drawn criticism

    from environmentalists--the construction of two new nuclear reactors, at Khmelnitsky and

    Rivne, known as K-Two and R-Four. Ukraine has said the two reactors, which are about

    80 percent finished, are needed to compensate for the energy lost from shutting down

    Chornobyl.

    But there is growing Western reluctance to fund the project. Among the most vocal

    opponents are Germany, Austria and Sweden, which have offered to fund non- nuclear

    alternatives.

    Emmanuel Bergasse, an expert in transition economies at the Paris-based

    International Energy Agency (IEA), says Ukraine will have to choose between three main

    fuels. The first choice, he notes, is "expensive and environmentally- polluting domestic

    coal, but the reform program of the present government calls for less aid to the coal sector.

    The second alternative is to put more emphasis on environmentally friendly gas--but...gas

    is imported at quite a high cost from Russia and other CIS states, and further increases in

    gas imports would increase Ukraine's dependence on its powerful neighbor.

    Furthermore..., Ukraine already has a huge gas debt [vis-a-vis] Russia. The third

    alternative is nuclear power, which is relatively cheap but controversial both at home and

    abroad and which also would increase the country's dependence on Russia for securing

    nuclear fuel."

    Munchmeyer, Bergasse, and other energy experts say it is doubtful whether

    Ukraine really needs to build any new energy plants. Instead, Ukraine could meet its

    energy needs by better energy usage. According to Munchmeyer, "the energy problem

    existing in Ukraine is a fuel problem and an inefficiency problem. So on the one side, there

    is a lack of fuel and there is a lack of organization to get the fuel into the right places at the

    same time. The other thing is this huge inefficiency of the energy system. Ukraine is using

    five to eight times more electricity for producing goods compared to Western Europe."

    Wasting energy is endemic throughout the countries of the former East Bloc.

    Bergasse says one of the main causes of poor energy efficiency are the high subsidies paid

    for energy purchases. He says a 1999 IEA study of 10 countries with heavy energy

    subsidies--including Russia and Kazakhstan--showed there is no incentive for saving

    energy whenever energy is subsidized or sold below cost of production.

    "The non-payment problem which is pervasive throughout the CIS, although

    improving of late, is another form of energy subsidy," he explains, "So we calculated that

    the energy-savings potential of Russia alone is so enormous that if subsidies were

    abolished in Russia, Russia could save about twice the energy which Ukraine consumes

    today alone."

    Bergasse says remodeling the energy sector is dependent on more overarching

    reforms. He says the three Baltic states have made the most progress toward cutting energy

    waste, partly because they have better defined property rights. Baltic homeowners,

    Bergasse says, feel more secure in making the investment to upgrade their home energy

    efficiency. CIS countries are still lagging behind in this regard, however.

    The author is an RFE/RL senior editor based in Prague.

    08-06-00


    Reprinted with permission of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty
    URL: http://www.rferl.org


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