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Voice of America, 00-01-16

Voice of America: Selected Articles Directory - Previous Article - Next Article

From: The Voice of America <gopher://gopher.voa.gov>


CONTENTS

  • [01] ARKAN DEATH (L-ONLY) BY TIM BELAY (TIRANA, ALBANIA)
  • [02] TURKEY - GEORGIA (L-ONLY) BY AMBERIN ZAMAN (ANKARA)
  • [03] ARKAN/REACTION (L-ONLY) BY TIM BELAY (TIRANA)

  • [01] ARKAN DEATH (L-ONLY) BY TIM BELAY (TIRANA, ALBANIA)

    DATE=1/15/2000
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-258103
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: The notorious Serb paramilitary leader known as Arkan has been shot to death in a Belgrade hotel. Tim Belay in the neighboring Balkan nation, Albania, reports on the death of a man who had been indicted on war crimes charges by a U-N tribunal.

    TEXT: Witnesses say Arkan was shot in the lobby of Belgrade's Intercontinental Hotel by a group of attackers. One of his bodyguards also was killed and another person seriously injured. The witnesses say Arkan and his companions were sitting in a sectioned- off part of the hotel lobby when the gunmen burst in and opened fire. A physician who examined Arkan in a Belgrade emergency room said "all vital functions" had stopped. He told reporters several bullets had hit Arkan in the head. Arkan, also known as Zeljko Raznatovic, was indicted in 1997 for alleged war crimes in Bosnia, but the charges were kept secret until last year's NATO air campaign in the Balkans. His paramilitary forces also have been accused of involvement in atrocities during the war in Croatia that started in 1991. Arkan's forces sided with Serb rebels in both Bosnia and Croatia. His militia, known as the Tigers, also was accused of operating against ethnic Albanians in Kosovo. In addition, Arkan had been sought on bank robbery charges in Western Europe in the 1970s and 1980s. (SIGNED)
    NEB/TB/JP 15-Jan-2000 16:01 PM EDT (15-Jan-2000 2101 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America


    [02] TURKEY - GEORGIA (L-ONLY) BY AMBERIN ZAMAN (ANKARA)

    DATE=1/15/2000
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-258100
    INTERNET=YES CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: Turkish President Suleyman Demirel is proposing the establishment of a Caucasus regional stability pact today (Saturday), the second day of his visit to neighboring Georgia. From the Turkish capital Ankara, Amberin Zaman has the details.

    TEXT: Georgian President Eduard Shavardnadze described the pact aimed at strengthening political, economic and security ties between Turkey, Azerbaijan and Georgia as extremely important for the region. And President Demirel said the proposed members shared the political will to make such a pact a reality. Analysts say the proposed accord is designed to counter Russian efforts to maintain influence over the former Soviet Republics in the region. Both Georgia and Azerbaijan have experienced botched coup and assasination attempts against their respective leaders in recent years. Regional experts have said they suspect elements in Russia were involved. There have also been fears that fighting in Russia's ongoing offensive against Chechen rebels could spill over into the southern Caucasus republics. Russia has repeatedly accused Georgia of helping the Chechen rebels. Analysts say that Turkey's regional stability pact proposal sends a clear message to Moscow to draw the line at Chechyna. Turkey, a key member of NATO, has strong ethnic and economic ties with Azerbaijan. In a bid to expand its influence in the region, Turkey is also seeking to become the main export route for vast reserves of Azeri and Central Asian oil and natural gas. Those plans are strongly opposed by Russia, which is reportedly stepping up pressure on Georgia to block proposed oil and gas pipelines from being built on its territory. Part of the Turkish president's agenda in Georgia was to persuade Mr Schevardnadze to drop any remaining objections his government has for building the pipeline network. Building a so-called East-West energy corridor between Central Asia and Turkey is a strategic goal of the Clinton administration. The aim is to reduce the former Soviet states' economic dependency on Russia and open up new opportunities for American investors. (SIGNED)
    NEB/AZ/JP 15-Jan-2000 13:34 PM EDT (15-Jan-2000 1834 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America


    [03] ARKAN/REACTION (L-ONLY) BY TIM BELAY (TIRANA)

    DATE=1/16/2000
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-258113
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: The notorious Serb paramilitary leader known as Arkan was shot to death in a Belgrade hotel Saturday. Tim Belay, in the neighboring Balkan nation of Albania, reports on reaction to the death of a man who had been indicted on war crimes charges by a U-N tribunal.

    TEXT: Officials say the assassination of Zeljko Raznatovic - also known as Arkan - was not much of a surprise, but it may make it more difficult to prosecute other accused Balkan war criminals. Arkan was killed by unidentified gunmen while leaving a restaurant inside Belgrade's Hotel Intercontinental. Two others died in the gunfire, including his bodyguard. The 47-year-old Arkan was under indictment by a U-N tribunal for the former Yugoslavia for alleged war crimes in Bosnia-Herzegovina and Croatia. An adviser to the Bosnian-Muslim presidency says his violent death was no surprise. The adviser said he was sorry only that Arkan would not go to The Hague to testify at the tribunal against Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic, also indicted for alleged war crimes. Reaction by the United States was similar. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright said the United States took no satisfaction in Arkan's murder and would have wanted him to stand trial in The Hague. British Foreign Secretary Robin Cook also said he was not surprised that the man had died violently. Arkan briefly entered the Serbian parliament in 1992 as an independent deputy from the southern Kosovo province. He made a practice of telling Kosovo's Albanian majority to take a hike over the mountains to Albania if they did not like Serbian domination. (SIGNED)
    NEB/TB/ALW/RAE 16-Jan-2000 10:34 AM EDT (16-Jan-2000 1534 UTC)
    NNNN
    Source: Voice of America


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