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Voice of America, 01-08-08

Voice of America: Selected Articles Directory - Previous Article - Next Article

From: The Voice of America <gopher://gopher.voa.gov>

SLUG: 2-279109 US / Macedonia (L) DATE: NOTE NUMBER:

CONTENTS

  • [01] U-S / MACEDONIA (L) BY SCOTT STEARNS (WHITE HOUSE)
  • [02] U-S / MACEDONIA (S) BY SCOTT STEARNS (WHITE HOUSE)
  • [03] MACEDONIA (L-UPD) BY JEFF BIELEY (SKOPJE)
  • [04] NATO / MACEDONIA (L-ONLY) BY ROGER WILKISON (BRUSSELS)
  • [05] WEDNESDAY'S EDITORIALS BY ANDREW GUTHRIE (WASHINGTON)
  • [06] WEDNESDAY'S EDITORIALS BY ANDREW GUTHRIE (WASHINGTON)
  • [07] WEDNESDAY'S EDITORIALS BY ANDREW GUTHRIE (WASHINGTON)
  • [08] MACEDONIA (L ONLY) BY JEFF BIELEY (SKOPJE)
  • [09] TURKEY / ISRAEL (L-O) BY AMBERIN ZAMAN (ANKARA)

  • [01] U-S / MACEDONIA (L) BY SCOTT STEARNS (WHITE HOUSE)

    DATE=08/08/01
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-279109
    CONTENT: VOICED AT:

    INTRO: The United States has condemned an ambush in Macedonia in which ten government soldiers were killed. V-O-A's Scott Stearns reports a State Department spokesman also said the United States hopes the the warring sides in Macedonia will sign the tentative peace agreement announced Wednesday.

    TEXT: State Department spokesman Richard Boucher says the United States condemns the ambush on government troops near the city of Tetovo.

    /// BOUCHER ACT 1 ///

    The ambush this morning by the insurgents was really an outrageous act of violence.

    /// END ACT ///

    It is the worst violence of a six-month insurgency by ethnic Albanians fighting for a greater say in how Macedonia is run. Mr. Boucher says the ambush comes at a critical moment for the country as European and American mediators work out the details for a peace deal that is now expected to be signed Monday. Macedonia has agreed to key points in the plan, including granting the Albanian minority a greater role in the police, parliament, and education. Under the plan, more than three-thousand NATO peacekeeprs would be deployed in Macedonia to disarm the militants. But that is only if the ceasefire holds. Mr. Boucher says it is important to close this political deal before the violence gets worse.

    /// BOUCHER ACT 2 ///

    We think the importance of doing that is made all the more apparent by the attacks and difficulties of the last few days, and we would like to point out once again that the conclusion of a political arrangement, the final conclusion and signature of a political arrangement, would actually open many doors for Macedonia and opportunities for Macedonia.

    /// END ACT ///

    The arrangement includes a framework for constitutional reform and a selective amnesty for members of the National Liberation Army who carried-out Wednesday's ambush . Guerillas opened fire with machineguns and mortars 20 kilometers west of the capital, Skopje, killing eight soldiers and two officers who burned to death in their vehicle. (Signed)
    NEB/SKS/JWH SLUG: 2-279108 US / Macedonia (S) DATE: NOTE NUMBER:

    [02] U-S / MACEDONIA (S) BY SCOTT STEARNS (WHITE HOUSE)

    DATE=08/08/01
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-279108
    CONTENT: VOICED AT:

    INTRO: The United States has condemned an ambush in Macedonia in which ten government soldiers were killed. V-O-A's Scott Stearns reports a State Department spokesman also said the United States hopes the the warring sides in Macedonia will sign the tentative peace agreement announced Wednesday.

    TEXT: State Department spokesman Richard Boucher condemned the ambush on government troops near the city of Tetovo.

    /// BOUCHER ACT ///

    The ambush this morning by the insurgents was really an outrageous act of violence.

    /// END ACT ///

    It is the worst violence of a six-month insurgency by ethnic Albanians fighting for a greater say in how Macedonia is run . Mr. Boucher says the ambush comes at a critical moment for the country as European and American mediators work out the details for a peace deal that is now expected to be signed Monday. Macedonia has agreed to key points in the plan, including granting the Albanian minority a greater role in the police, parliament, and education. Under the plan, more than three-thousand NATO peacekeeprs would be deployed in Macedonia to disarm the militants. (Signed)
    NEB/SKS/JWH SLUG: 2-279105 Macedonia (l-UPD) DATE: NOTE NUMBER:

    [03] MACEDONIA (L-UPD) BY JEFF BIELEY (SKOPJE)

    DATE=08/08/01
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-279105
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    ///// UPDATES 2-279096 WITH NEW INFORMATION /////

    INTRO: Macedonia's political leaders have initialed a preliminary peace deal under heavy pressure. The surprise move came hours after the prime minister had threatened to walk out of negotiations. Jeff Bieley reports from Skopje that a major guerrilla attack earlier and subsequent heavy fighting had threatened to scuttle the talks.

    TEXT: The leaders of the four largest political parties in Macedonia initialed a preliminary agreement aimed at ending a six-month Albanian guerrilla insurgency. The surprise turn of events followed a rebel attack that killed at least 10 government soldiers. Following the attack, Prime Minister Ljubco Georgievski's party said it would withdraw from peace talks between ethnic-Albanian and Macedonian political leaders. But under strong pressure from U-S and European Union envoys, all sides initialed a document of reforms that had already been agreed to in 11-days of negotiations. The deal calls for expanded rights for the country's ethnic-Albanian minority in key areas demanded by the guerillas. But several minor issues will have to be settled before a formal signing ceremony on Monday. One Albanian politician cautioned other events could wreck the deal, saying, "...until Monday is a long time." Wednesday morning, an ambush by the ethnic Albanian N-L-A guerrillas killed 10 Macedonian soldiers on a road west of the capital, Skopje. The army responded by sealing off the main highway linking the capital with Tetovo and deploying attack helicopters to strike rebel groups in the area. Fighting later broke out farther west, with heavy machine-gun fire reported in Tetovo and shelling heard coming from nearby villages. The clashes stopped about half an hour before the peace agreement was signed in the southwestern city of Ohrid. (SIGNED)
    NEB/JB/GE/RAE SLUG: 2-279102 NATO - Macedonia (L only) DATE: NOTE NUMBER:


    [04] NATO / MACEDONIA (L-ONLY) BY ROGER WILKISON (BRUSSELS)

    DATE=8/8/01
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-279102
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: NATO has condemned an attack (Wednesday) by ethnic Albanian insurgents that killed 10 Macedonian soldiers, saying it was detrimental to all of the Balkan country's people. V-O-A correspondent Roger Wilkison reports the deadliest single guerrilla attack against government forces since the insurgency erupted six months ago, nearly derailed the Western-sponsored peace talks between majority Slav and minority ethnic Albanian political parties.

    TEXT: NATO spokesman Yves Brodeur says NATO vigorously condemns the ambush by insurgents of a Macedonian military convoy and the death of the soldiers.

    /// BRODEUR ACT ///

    This latest incident runs against the efforts of all those who are working so hard to try and achieve a political agreement in order to put an end to the crisis. This is not helping the cause of peace and is detrimental to the interest of the population of the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia as a whole. Violence cannot win. Violence cannot bring anything good for anyone.

    /// END ACT ///

    Mr. Brodeur says the only lasting solution to the Macedonian crisis is a political agreement. Emissaries from the United States and the European Union have been pushing a peace package that would grant ethnic Albanians more jobs in the police force and wider use of their language in exchange for the insurgents laying down their weapons. Ethnic Albanians make up about 30 percent of Macedonia's population. Despite Wednesday's ambush, subsequent fighting in the northwestern town of Tetovo and a temporary withdrawal from the talks by the main Macedonian political party, E-U envoy Francois Leotard announced that all of the political parties involved have pledged to sign a peace deal next week. NATO has agreed to deploy three thousand troops to Macedonia to collect weapons from the insurgents once a political agreement has been signed and a ceasefire respected by all parties is in place. But NATO officials admit they do not know how many weapons the guerrillas have nor whether the guerrillas will turn in all of their arms. (Signed)
    NEB/RW/KL/RH SLUG: 6-12418 Wednesday's Editorials DATE: NOTE NUMBER:

    [05] WEDNESDAY'S EDITORIALS BY ANDREW GUTHRIE (WASHINGTON)

    DATE=08/08/01
    TYPE=U-S EDITORIAL DIGEST
    NUMBER= (cq) 6-12418
    INTERNET=YES EDITOR=ASSIGNMENTS
    TELEPHONE=619-3335
    CONTENT=

    /// RE-ISSUING, CORRECTING THIRD GRAPH FROM END OF TEXT ///

    INTRO: U-S newspapers are commenting in editorials (Wednesday) about a potential breakthrough in the Northern Ireland peace process and about a large book advance for President Clinton's memoirs. Other commentaries discuss human cloning, Argentina's economic situation, the U-S - Mexican truck controversy, and a former hostage's legal claim against Iran. Here is ___________ with a closer look and some quotes in today's U-S Editorial Digest.

    TEXT: A proposal described as a possible breakthrough in the Northern Ireland peace process is drawing a good deal of comment. The Irish Republican Army (I-R-A) has reportedly said it will begin destroying its arms caches. But the Ulster Unionists are demanding an immediate start to the plan, a demand that could lead to the collapse of Northern Ireland's power sharing government. The Cleveland (Ohio) Plain Dealer is cautiously optimistic.

    VOICE: At last, the Irish Republican Army has demonstrated that it knows another negotiating strategy besides intransigence. After months of defiance and years of stalling, the I-R-A has offered a disarmament plan that satisfies an independent commission charged to oversee decommissioning (disarming).

    TEXT: In New Jersey's capital, the (Trenton) Times says there is now "reason for hope -- again," and the Denver (Colorado) Post comments:

    VOICE: Heretofore, the I-R-A has been reluctant to disarm ... because such an act could be perceived as defeat. By calling for destruction of the weapons, however, the latest agreement avoids such a connotation.

    TEXT: The Allentown (Pennsylvania) Morning Call is more skeptical, saying the "I-R'A's fine words must be followed by real action," and adding, "Complicating matters is the fact that the disarmament commission has agreed not to reveal the I-R-A's method for disarming." The Minneapolis, Minnesota, Star Tribune frets that now that the I-R-A has changed its position, the Protestants are balking.

    VOICE: ... The (Good Friday accord)... has never been closer to fulfillment -- or farther. ... Now ... (Unionist leader David) Trimble is backpedaling. (He says) his party will stick with the new power-sharing government only if the I-R-A starts destroying weapons in the next few days ... virtually (assuring) dissolution of the new assembly...

    TEXT: U-S newspapers also commented on the approximately ten-million-dollars former president Bill Clinton will get from the Alfred A. Knopf publishing house to write his memoirs. The New York Times says of the proposed work:

    VOICE: It would be helpful for us to know more of what was in Mr. Clinton's mind and what impelled him to do what he did, whether the subject is welfare reform, Mideast negotiations, Monica Lewinsky or Marc Rich. .... We have seen many Bill Clintons over the years, enough to make this one book a chorus of voices.

    TEXT: The Los Angeles Times places the news in the context of what it suggests is a Clinton renaissance.

    VOICE: After a few missteps, (Mr.) Clinton seems to have hit his post-White House stride, beginning with putting his office in Harlem. The memoir will allow him to make the case that, for all the fireworks, his presidency was about something more substantial that sexual peccadilloes.

    TEXT: The Greensburg (Pennsylvania) Tribune-Review calls the money "an excessive amount..." It says the figure is:

    VOICE: ... a monetary caricature representative of the excessive man ... Mr. Clinton is and the immoderate presidency over which he presided. ...

    TEXT: U-S newspapers also comments on the debate about the possible cloning of a human being. An Italian doctor said (Tuesday) in Washington that he will go ahead with plans to try to clone a human being in Italy, where such action is not illegal. The U-S House of Representatives has just passed a bill making it illegal in the United States. The Chattanooga (Tennessee) Free Press says: VOICED: ... With the science of cloning having been proved with the birth of Dolly the sheep, it was inevitable that some would rush to ignore the ethical issues, opening the Pandora's Box of cloning human beings somewhere.

    TEXT: Portland's Oregonian comments:

    VOICE: Cloning is ... still in its infancy. Skipping from sheep and cows to human babies during the trial-and-error stage of experimentation seems an unconscionable act of cruelty and arrogance yet this is precisely the plan. ... Before Dolly the cloned sheep was born, researchers had 277 failed Dollies. Imagine that many infants thrown away before an acceptable baby-shaped clone emerged.

    TEXT: And the Manchester (New Hampshire) Union Leader frets: "The religious among us are right to wonder whether cloned humans will possess souls, since their creation would occur so inhumanely...

    TEXT: The Charleston (South Carolina) Post and Courier comments about Argentina's serious economic crisis, suggesting it is the worst in the country's history:

    VOICE: Now Argentina must save itself. The Bush administration made the right decision by not coming to the rescue with a gigantic bail-out... as President Clinton did (with) Mexico... Once and for all, Argentina must overcome the political divisions and class antagonism that have transformed a rich country into a Third World mendicant.

    TEXT: The Sacramento (California) Bee comments on for the fatal shoot-down in April of a small plane carrying an American Christian missionary family by Peru's air force with U-S C-I-A help:

    VOICE: There was a tragic breakdown in communication ...and a failure to follow prescribed procedures and exercise caution before firing at innocents. ...The drug interdiction program should be discontinued, at least until everyone engaged can converse comfortably in both English and Spanish...

    TEXT: The Providence (Rhode Island) Journal comments on the proposal to allow Mexican trucks free access to the United States. It says "there is no good reason why Mexican trucks should be subject to more stringent standards... (than) ...American or Canadian trucks" as some in Congress are suggesting. In Nebraska, the Omaha World Herald, says Russia can no longer afford the size of its nuclear arsenal, and is facing economic "disarmament," and it suggests:

    VOICE: With a weakened Russia willing to bargain, the United States has a crucial opportunity to maintain our security while lowering the level of nuclear arms. Few tasks will be more important for the Bush administration.

    TEXT: The Washington Post expresses concern about a U-S judge's ruling that Iran must pay 314-million dollars to the family of a former hostage in Lebanon, the Reverend Lawrence Jenco. The Omaha World Herald agrees:

    VOICE: If it becomes accepted that a judge in this country can penalize governments abroad for various abuses, what is to prevent judges in other countries from similarly imposing burdens on the U-S government?

    TEXT: On that note, we conclude our editorial sampling from Wednesday's U-S newspapers.
    NEB/ANG/JWH SLUG: 6-12418 Wednesday's Editorials DATE: NOTE NUMBER:


    [06] WEDNESDAY'S EDITORIALS BY ANDREW GUTHRIE (WASHINGTON)

    DATE=08/08/01
    TYPE=U-S EDITORIAL DIGEST
    NUMBER= (cq) 6-12418
    INTERNET=YES EDITOR=ASSIGNMENTS
    TELEPHONE=619-3335
    CONTENT=
    /// EDS: RE-ISSUING, CORRECTING COUNTRY NAME IN THIRD GRAPH FROM END OF TEXT -- LEBANON -- NOT IRAN ///

    INTRO: U-S newspapers are commenting in editorials (Wednesday) about a potential breakthrough in the Northern Ireland peace process and about a large book advance for President Clinton's memoirs. Other commentaries discuss human cloning, Argentina's economic situation, the U-S - Mexican truck controversy, and a former hostage's legal claim against Iran. Here is ___________ with a closer look and some quotes in today's U-S Editorial Digest.

    TEXT: A proposal described as a possible breakthrough in the Northern Ireland peace process is drawing a good deal of comment. The Irish Republican Army (I-R-A) has reportedly said it will begin destroying its arms caches. But the Ulster Unionists are demanding an immediate start to the plan, a demand that could lead to the collapse of Northern Ireland's power sharing government. The Cleveland (Ohio) Plain Dealer is cautiously optimistic.

    VOICE: At last, the Irish Republican Army has demonstrated that it knows another negotiating strategy besides intransigence. After months of defiance and years of stalling, the I-R-A has offered a disarmament plan that satisfies an independent commission charged to oversee decommissioning (disarming).

    TEXT: In New Jersey's capital, the (Trenton) Times says there is now "reason for hope -- again," and the Denver (Colorado) Post comments:

    VOICE: Heretofore, the I-R-A has been reluctant to disarm ... because such an act could be perceived as defeat. By calling for destruction of the weapons, however, the latest agreement avoids such a connotation.

    TEXT: The Allentown (Pennsylvania) Morning Call is more skeptical, saying the "I-R'A's fine words must be followed by real action," and adding, "Complicating matters is the fact that the disarmament commission has agreed not to reveal the I-R-A's method for disarming." The Minneapolis, Minnesota, Star Tribune frets that now that the I-R-A has changed its position, the Protestants are balking.

    VOICE: ... The (Good Friday accord)... has never been closer to fulfillment -- or farther. ... Now ... (Unionist leader David) Trimble is backpedaling. (He says) his party will stick with the new power-sharing government only if the I-R-A starts destroying weapons in the next few days ... virtually (assuring) dissolution of the new assembly...

    TEXT: U-S newspapers also commented on the approximately ten-million-dollars former president Bill Clinton will get from the Alfred A. Knopf publishing house to write his memoirs. The New York Times says of the proposed work:

    VOICE: It would be helpful for us to know more of what was in Mr. Clinton's mind and what impelled him to do what he did, whether the subject is welfare reform, Mideast negotiations, Monica Lewinsky or Marc Rich. .... We have seen many Bill Clintons over the years, enough to make this one book a chorus of voices.

    TEXT: The Los Angeles Times places the news in the context of what it suggests is a Clinton renaissance.

    VOICE: After a few missteps, (Mr.) Clinton seems to have hit his post-White House stride, beginning with putting his office in Harlem. The memoir will allow him to make the case that, for all the fireworks, his presidency was about something more substantial that sexual peccadilloes.

    TEXT: The Greensburg (Pennsylvania) Tribune-Review calls the money "an excessive amount..." It says the figure is:

    VOICE: ... a monetary caricature representative of the excessive man ... Mr. Clinton is and the immoderate presidency over which he presided. ...

    TEXT: U-S newspapers also comments on the debate about the possible cloning of a human being. An Italian doctor said (Tuesday) in Washington that he will go ahead with plans to try to clone a human being in Italy, where such action is not illegal. The U-S House of Representatives has just passed a bill making it illegal in the United States. The Chattanooga (Tennessee) Free Press says: VOICED: ... With the science of cloning having been proved with the birth of Dolly the sheep, it was inevitable that some would rush to ignore the ethical issues, opening the Pandora's Box of cloning human beings somewhere.

    TEXT: Portland's Oregonian comments:

    VOICE: Cloning is ... still in its infancy. Skipping from sheep and cows to human babies during the trial-and-error stage of experimentation seems an unconscionable act of cruelty and arrogance yet this is precisely the plan. ... Before Dolly the cloned sheep was born, researchers had 277 failed Dollies. Imagine that many infants thrown away before an acceptable baby-shaped clone emerged.

    TEXT: And the Manchester (New Hampshire) Union Leader frets: "The religious among us are right to wonder whether cloned humans will possess souls, since their creation would occur so inhumanely...

    TEXT: The Charleston (South Carolina) Post and Courier comments about Argentina's serious economic crisis, suggesting it is the worst in the country's history:

    VOICE: Now Argentina must save itself. The Bush administration made the right decision by not coming to the rescue with a gigantic bail-out... as President Clinton did (with) Mexico... Once and for all, Argentina must overcome the political divisions and class antagonism that have transformed a rich country into a Third World mendicant.

    TEXT: The Sacramento (California) Bee comments on for the fatal shoot-down in April of a small plane carrying an American Christian missionary family by Peru's air force with U-S C-I-A help:

    VOICE: There was a tragic breakdown in communication ...and a failure to follow prescribed procedures and exercise caution before firing at innocents. ...The drug interdiction program should be discontinued, at least until everyone engaged can converse comfortably in both English and Spanish...

    TEXT: The Providence (Rhode Island) Journal comments on the proposal to allow Mexican trucks free access to the United States. It says "there is no good reason why Mexican trucks should be subject to more stringent standards... (than) ...American or Canadian trucks" as some in Congress are suggesting. In Nebraska, the Omaha World Herald, says Russia can no longer afford the size of its nuclear arsenal, and is facing economic "disarmament," and it suggests:

    VOICE: With a weakened Russia willing to bargain, the United States has a crucial opportunity to maintain our security while lowering the level of nuclear arms. Few tasks will be more important for the Bush administration.

    TEXT: The Washington Post expresses concern about a U-S judge's ruling that Lebanon must pay 314-million dollars to the family of a former hostage in Iran, the Reverend Lawrence Jenco. The Omaha World Herald agrees:

    VOICE: If it becomes accepted that a judge in this country can penalize governments abroad for various abuses, what is to prevent judges in other countries from similarly imposing burdens on the U-S government?

    TEXT: On that note, we conclude our editorial sampling from Wednesday's U-S newspapers.
    NEB/ANG/JWH SLUG: 6-12418 Wednesday's Editorials DATE: NOTE NUMBER:


    [07] WEDNESDAY'S EDITORIALS BY ANDREW GUTHRIE (WASHINGTON)

    DATE=08/08/01
    TYPE=U-S EDITORIAL DIGEST
    NUMBER=6-12418
    INTERNET=YES EDITOR=ASSIGNMENTS
    TELEPHONE=619-3335
    CONTENT=

    INTRO: U-S newspapers are commenting in editorials (Wednesday) about a potential breakthrough in the Northern Ireland peace process and about a large book advance for President Clinton's memoirs. Other commentaries discuss human cloning, Argentina's economic situation, the U-S - Mexican truck controversy, and a former hostage's legal claim against Iran. Here is ___________ with a closer look and some quotes in today's U-S Editorial Digest.

    TEXT: A proposal described as a possible breakthrough in the Northern Ireland peace process is drawing a good deal of comment. The Irish Republican Army (I-R-A) has reportedly said it will begin destroying its arms caches. But the Ulster Unionists are demanding an immediate start to the plan, a demand that could lead to the collapse of Northern Ireland's power sharing government. The Cleveland (Ohio) Plain Dealer is cautiously optimistic.

    VOICE: At last, the Irish Republican Army has demonstrated that it knows another negotiating strategy besides intransigence. After months of defiance and years of stalling, the I-R-A has offered a disarmament plan that satisfies an independent commission charged to oversee decommissioning (disarming).

    TEXT: In New Jersey's capital, the (Trenton) Times says there is now "reason for hope -- again," and the Denver (Colorado) Post comments:

    VOICE: Heretofore, the I-R-A has been reluctant to disarm ... because such an act could be perceived as defeat. By calling for destruction of the weapons, however, the latest agreement avoids such a connotation.

    TEXT: The Allentown (Pennsylvania) Morning Call is more skeptical, saying the "I-R'A's fine words must be followed by real action," and adding, "Complicating matters is the fact that the disarmament commission has agreed not to reveal the I-R-A's method for disarming." The Minneapolis, Minnesota, Star Tribune frets that now that the I-R-A has changed its position, the Protestants are balking.

    VOICE: ... The (Good Friday accord)... has never been closer to fulfillment -- or farther. ... Now ... (Unionist leader David) Trimble is backpedaling. (He says) his party will stick with the new power-sharing government only if the I-R-A starts destroying weapons in the next few days ... virtually (assuring) dissolution of the new assembly...

    TEXT: U-S newspapers also commented on the approximately ten-million-dollars former president Bill Clinton will get from the Alfred A. Knopf publishing house to write his memoirs. The New York Times says of the proposed work:

    VOICE: It would be helpful for us to know more of what was in Mr. Clinton's mind and what impelled him to do what he did, whether the subject is welfare reform, Mideast negotiations, Monica Lewinsky or Marc Rich. .... We have seen many Bill Clintons over the years, enough to make this one book a chorus of voices.

    TEXT: The Los Angeles Times places the news in the context of what it suggests is a Clinton renaissance.

    VOICE: After a few missteps, (Mr.) Clinton seems to have hit his post-White House stride, beginning with putting his office in Harlem. The memoir will allow him to make the case that, for all the fireworks, his presidency was about something more substantial that sexual peccadilloes.

    TEXT: The Greensburg (Pennsylvania) Tribune-Review calls the money "an excessive amount..." It says the figure is:

    VOICE: ... a monetary caricature representative of the excessive man ... Mr. Clinton is and the immoderate presidency over which he presided. ...

    TEXT: U-S newspapers also comments on the debate about the possible cloning of a human being. An Italian doctor said (Tuesday) in Washington that he will go ahead with plans to try to clone a human being in Italy, where such action is not illegal. The U-S House of Representatives has just passed a bill making it illegal in the United States. The Chattanooga (Tennessee) Free Press says: VOICED: ... With the science of cloning having been proved with the birth of Dolly the sheep, it was inevitable that some would rush to ignore the ethical issues, opening the Pandora's Box of cloning human beings somewhere.

    TEXT: Portland's Oregonian comments:

    VOICE: Cloning is ... still in its infancy. Skipping from sheep and cows to human babies during the trial-and-error stage of experimentation seems an unconscionable act of cruelty and arrogance yet this is precisely the plan. ... Before Dolly the cloned sheep was born, researchers had 277 failed Dollies. Imagine that many infants thrown away before an acceptable baby-shaped clone emerged.

    TEXT: And the Manchester (New Hampshire) Union Leader frets: "The religious among us are right to wonder whether cloned humans will possess souls, since their creation would occur so inhumanely...

    TEXT: The Charleston (South Carolina) Post and Courier comments about Argentina's serious economic crisis, suggesting it is the worst in the country's history:

    VOICE: Now Argentina must save itself. The Bush administration made the right decision by not coming to the rescue with a gigantic bail-out... as President Clinton did (with) Mexico... Once and for all, Argentina must overcome the political divisions and class antagonism that have transformed a rich country into a Third World mendicant.

    TEXT: The Sacramento (California) Bee comments on for the fatal shoot-down in April of a small plane carrying an American Christian missionary family by Peru's air force with U-S C-I-A help:

    VOICE: There was a tragic breakdown in communication ...and a failure to follow prescribed procedures and exercise caution before firing at innocents. ...The drug interdiction program should be discontinued, at least until everyone engaged can converse comfortably in both English and Spanish...

    TEXT: The Providence (Rhode Island) Journal comments on the proposal to allow Mexican trucks free access to the United States. It says "there is no good reason why Mexican trucks should be subject to more stringent standards... (than) ...American or Canadian trucks" as some in Congress are suggesting. In Nebraska, the Omaha World Herald, says Russia can no longer afford the size of its nuclear arsenal, and is facing economic "disarmament," and it suggests:

    VOICE: With a weakened Russia willing to bargain, the United States has a crucial opportunity to maintain our security while lowering the level of nuclear arms. Few tasks will be more important for the Bush administration.

    TEXT: The Washington Post expresses concern about a U-S judge's ruling that Iran must pay 314-million dollars to the family of a former hostage in Iran, the Reverend Lawrence Jenco. The Omaha World Herald agrees:

    VOICE: If it becomes accepted that a judge in this country can penalize governments abroad for various abuses, what is to prevent judges in other countries from similarly imposing burdens on the U-S government?

    TEXT: On that note, we conclude our editorial sampling from Wednesday's U-S newspapers.
    NEB/ANG/JWH SLUG: 2-279096 Macedonia (L only) DATE: NOTE NUMBER:


    [08] MACEDONIA (L ONLY) BY JEFF BIELEY (SKOPJE)

    DATE=08/08/01
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-279096
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: In Macedonia, ethnic-Albanian rebels are being blamed for an attack against a military convoy that killed ten government soldiers (Wednesday). Jeff Bieley in Skopje reports the attack has further complicated efforts to end months of fighting in Macedonia.

    TEXT: The government soldiers were killed when their convoy was ambushed on a road linking the capital with the western city of Tetovo. A spokesman for Prime Minister Ljubco Georgievski accused ethnic-Albanian rebels of carrying out the attack, which took place 15 kilometers west of the capital, near the village of Bojane. In response, the army sealed off the main highway leading west out of Skopje and sent attack helicopters to strike rebel groups in the area. After the attack, Prime Minister Ljubco Georgievski's party withdrew from peace talks between ethnic-Albanian and Macedonian political leaders. The talks had been scheduled to resume later on Wednesday. A spokesman said the prime minister's party would decide soon whether it would stay in the talks. A joint statement by international envoys mediating the peace talks strongly condemned the attack, saying it is now "all the more important to conclude the discussions" on a political deal. The prime minister's spokesman said it appeared that the rebels are mounting a new offensive to capture more territory in the north of the country, where they already control several villages. The rebel attack occurred one day after Macedonian police killed five Albanians rebels in a raid in Skopje. (Signed)
    NEB/JB/KL/JWH SLUG: 2-279093 Turkey/Israel (L-O) DATE: NOTE NUMBER:


    [09] TURKEY / ISRAEL (L-O) BY AMBERIN ZAMAN (ANKARA)

    DATE=08/08/01
    TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
    NUMBER=2-279093
    CONTENT=
    VOICED AT:

    INTRO: Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon made a one-day visit to Turkey, Israel's staunchest regional ally. Amberin Zaman reports from Ankara that Mr. Sharon was seeking Turkey's help to end nearly 11-months of Israeli-Palestinian violence.

    TEXT: Prime Minister Sharon arrived in Turkey Wednesday on his first-ever visit here since he was elected prime minister in February. During his day-long visit, Mr. Sharon held talks with Turkish Prime Minister Bulent Ecevit and President Ahmet Necdet Sezer. Speaking at a joint news conference following talks with Prime Minister Ecevit, the Israeli Prime Minister repeated his demands that the Palestinians end what he termed their acts of terror as a precondition for resuming peace talks. Turkish officials quoted by Turkish private television news channel, N-T-V, said the meeting between the two prime ministers had been stormy. Mr. Sharon asked his Turkish counterpart to exert pressure on Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat to end the nearly 11-month uprising in the Palestinian controlled West Bank and Gaza strip. Mr. Ecevit reportedly termed Mr. Sharon's demands - which include an international economic blockade against the Palestinians - as unrealistic. Turkey backs Palestinian aspirations for statehood. There is widespread public sympathy for the plight of the Palestinian people. Police broke up a pro-Palestinian demonstration in Istanbul and arrested 35 protestors. For all their differences, the two prime ministers agreed that escalating violence in the Middle East should not impact bilateral relations between their two countries. Those relations have been flourishing ever since the signing of a military cooperation agreement in 1996 under which Israel and Turkey conduct joint military exercises in their respective territories. Israel has also become one of Turkey's principal arms suppliers. Defense projects involving the sale of Israeli-made missiles and technology to upgrade Turkish tanks were among the main topics taken up by the two leaders on Wednesday. Arab nations and Iran have repeatedly expressed concerns that what they term the "strategic alliance" between Turkey and Israel poses a threat to regional security and peace. Both countries deny their military partnership targets neighboring countries. (SIGNED)
    NEB/AZ/GE/RAE


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